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5 Sunburn Mistakes | Summer Skin Care Myths
June 30, 2017

We’re all getting ready for the long Fourth of July weekend and summer--- BBQ’s, swimming, long days by the pool. While you’re on the right track if you’re following a correct skin care routine and keeping your skin protected, you should be aware of some of these common mistakes when it comes to protecting your skin. So you can stay sunburn free and protected this 4th of July and all summer long, make sure none of these statements are coming out of your mouth!

  1. “I put on sunscreen earlier, I’m good.”

When you’re out in the sun, you may be swimming. And if you are not swimming, you’re sweating. Whether you’re swimming or sweating, whatever products you put on your body, tend to come off.  No matter what you’re doing, you must re-apply your sunscreen! Every 40 minutes you should re-apply approximately 1 shot glass size to your entire body to help prevent the damaging effects of the sun.

  1. “I just want to get a base tan so I don’t look sick.”

Alright, we know you think you look better with a tan, but there are better ways to get golden (sunless tanner or tinted body oil anyone?). As we’ve said before, exposing your skin to UV light from the sun or a tanning bed is the worst thing for your skin.

You may think you’re looking healthier with a tan, but it’s quite the opposite. A tan is a giant scar on your skin, your body’s way of reacting to the sun’s radiation which affects your skin at the DNA level and is extremely damaging to you. Now there may be some of you saying, “Well, they say you should spend 20 minutes in the sun to get your daily dose of Vitamin D.” You don’t need to bask in the sun – supplements can provide your daily dose. Don’t damage your future in the false belief that it’s healthy.

  1. “I have a darker complexion, I don’t have to worry.”

You may think that your natural hue brings with it the gift of immunity to the sun and the damage it can do, but we hate to break the bad news – you’ll still get the effects. Though having increased melanin helps, it’s no match for sunscreen. Dark skin may provide a natural SPF factor of up to 13-14, but people are advised to use a minimum of SPF 30, so there’s a coverage gap that must be addressed. And remember, if you can get sunburned your skin can damage in the form of lines, wrinkles and early aging, or worse – skin cancer. So no matter what your skin type is or complexion, everyone should practice sun protection.

  1. “We’re just going for a boat ride, not tanning.”

Even if you’re just “out on the boat” covering up is one of the skincare essentials for the 4th of July and all summer. Being surrounded by highly reflective water, bouncing off all the surrounding light right on you, can lead to sunburn. Cover up naturally and throw some SPF 30 or higher sun protection into your tackle box; You’ll be as happy as a clam.

  1. “It’s SPF 50, I’m set for the whole day.”

Many people think that the higher the SPF, the longer they can stay out in the sun. While technically true, it doesn’t work how you think it does. An SPF of 30 means 97% protection from, perhaps, both UVA and UVB rays, so what would you guess an SPF of 50 to cover? Somewhere around 160%? Nope! Only 98%. A single percentage point increase in coverage from SPF 30 to 50. So don’t think just because you have a super high SPF cream you can be out in the sun all day without worry. Reapply the proper amount every 40 minutes as mentioned before, and then you can chill with some certainty.

So with all of this great advice, keeping the sun at bay while you’re on the bay, on the beach or on the lake should be a piece of cake! (Though we’ve got you covered for those “Oops I did it again!” moments as well – make sure you know how to treat sunburn).



*This blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice, treatment or diagnosis. Always seek the advice of your doctor or health provider with any questions or concerns you may have about a medical condition.





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